National anthem

The Perfect Mate

Football has been America's sport for a while now, there is nothing more American than the national anthem.

National anthem

Super Bowl I: The Pride of Arizona

The dueling marching bands were accompanied by Super Bowl spectators full throat in a cool moment that would be the beginning of one of America's most popular events every year.

National anthem

Super Bowl II: Grambling State University Marching Band

The Grambling State Marching Band did so well in the halftime show in Super Bowl I, the NFL invited them to do the national anthem at Super Bowl II. They didn't get much of a break though has they performed at halftime for the second year in a row.

National anthem

Super Bowl III: Lloyd Geisler

The first trumpet of the Washington Symphony Orchestra provided Super Bowl III with the sweet sound of his horn. Geisler would be the first solo performer and the first in a line of trumpet players who would play the national anthem.

National anthem

Super Bowl IV: Doc Severinson

Ever ask yourself what pairs well with trumpet and came up with a spoken word version of the national anthem? Somehow, the NFL did. It was an odd version of our nation's anthem at Super Bowl IV featuring actor Pat O'Brien, but it wasn't the most offensive rendition.

National anthem

Super Bowl V: Tommy Loy

Even legends have off days. It's just rough it had to be at one of the biggest sports days for Tommy Loy. The famous Dallas trumpeter's performance at Super Bowl V wasn't his cleanest, specifically a mid-song squeak. Even the best stumble sometimes.

National anthem

Super Bowl VI: U.S. Air Force Academy Chorale

The military's first crack at the national anthem was powerful, but ironically, the military got in the way. A flyover of eight F-4 Phantom's flying in the missing man formation drowned out part of the national anthem. Whoops.

National anthem

Super Bowl VII: Little Angels of Chicago's Holy Angels Church

Having children perform the national anthem was a genius choice by the NFL. Kids are cute, singing kids are even cuter and no one is going to bash them even if they were a bit pitchy to start Super Bowl VII. Although if Twitter existed back then, someone would've found a way.